Category Archives: Articles

Sharing positive news

In most industries it is unlikely that your CEO will be very happy if you tweet and facebook via linkedIn every time you encounter a new machinery issue, however it is rare that anyone will be facing problems that have not been faced and solved before.

So to that extent why not impress your CEO and tell everyone about your successes – you will have found many a solution and your team stepped up and made it right. After all your CEO probably signed your employment papers and your company only employs the best people! Right?

In a condition based environment we manage the asset population by a combination of strategies targeted at avoiding unnecessary maintenance. However, failures do occur – we like to call them – anomalies – as they come from nowhere, when we thought we had all bases covered. In reality these “outliers” are to be expected – the measure of our capability is how effectively we learn from them and bring them back into the protected environment so we can minimise their likelihood of reoccurrence and minimise their effect.

As is probably well known to you all, making mistakes and falling down is unavoidable in the real world. We learn from these events and we move on. Repeating mistakes however is unacceptable and we would do better to remember this by ensuring that;

1 – Every time we find an issue and fix it, we make sure that we check other similar systems and confirm that they are protected accordingly.

2 – We ensure that all our systems are setup to automatically capture evidence of similar events – which we may miss – so we can fix them.

3 – We tell our peers to look out for these issues and become active in the community.

Business advantage via reliability enhancements sounds attractive on one level but every time someone is killed or injured because we did not share the knowledge required to fix it – in some way we are all responsible.

This is NOT whistle blowing but professional engineering practice.

See the UK Engineering Council‘s statement on ethics here

No need to open main bearings on Man Diesel Engines

Click to view SL2012-522 Main Bearing Inspection

Man Diesel now state clearly that bearing removal is not recommended as normal practice and therefore not recommended unless evidence based reason dictates.

This is a clear indication that best practice has shifted from a direct inspection methodology to a condition based approach.

This represents a shift in emphasis where the OEM clearly states that opening bearings without cause is likely to increase the risk of issue, either directly by the introduction of new sources of failure such as dirt or re-build issues, or by implication by reducing the support in terms of warrantee, where non recommended strip down may in the future invalidate terms.

Herein a video of the process for bearing removal courtesy of Marine Insight (Apologies for corrupted quality at the end! DS)

Article in LNG World – Maintenance

LNGWSJan12LR

This is a short article that was created for LNG World and describes an overview of the soon to be available Machinery Condition Based Maintenance descriptive note which can be applied for companies who wish to operate their maintenance management on a risk based approach.

In essence this means that all nominated machines are maintained purely on the basis of condition as dictated by the condition monitoring analysis performed. In reality this means that NO item need be removed from service and required to be opened out for the purpose of credit for survey unless the CM data and associated records are unsupportive. Due dates will be removed and in all cases where condition continues to be acceptable items will not need to be withdrawn for inspection.

This is a high standard to achieve as it requires the cultural capability to manage risk based maintenance systems. It shall be viewed as an aspirational standard which rewards those who seek to exceed the minimal compliance requirements of the regulations but is also robust as the condition status has to be demonstrated as known on a continual basis.

We expect that there will be a number of companies who can move into this regime quite quickly but that what will happen is the vacuum that is created by this will be filled by companies who wish to perform at a higher level but who have some minor issues such as resourcing or implementation concerns. We will also be providing resource to assist these organisation to optimise their operations and move forward to a ensure that all operational and reliability related risks are As Low As Reasonably Practical – ALARP – a concept that must ultimately become accepted in the marine industry.